Skip to main content
Danville 859-236-8644
Liberty 606-722-0180
Mt. Vernon 606-256-3937

Danville | Liberty | Mount Vernon

Danville | Liberty | Mount Vernon

Order Contacts Online
Menu
Home »

Author: keplrpractice

Getting Back to Learning Requires Healthy Vision

Fun fact: 80% of the sensory information that reaches our brain comes from our eyes.

Absolutely amazing!

With so much uncertainty as our kids, teens and young adults go back to school this fall, one thing is for sure… our eyes are remarkably important to learning. Not only does 80% of the information to our brain come from our eyes, but also 80% of learning is through our eyes.

Learning and behavioral disorders should not be impulsively assumed without investigating the full spectrum of eye health, especially since vision and eye health issues are not always obvious.

Children who can see well outside of class may still struggle with their vision while learning. Eye alignment, eye teaming, eye movement and coordination, eye focus and dry eyes all influence how we all visually perform.

Take this story, for example. A New York Times article published by Laura Novak in 2007 narrates about a young girl who was prescribed three medications for attention deficit disorder and depression only to find out later that she had been living with convergence insufficiency since birth.

Convergence insufficiency, as outlined by the Mayo Clinic, is a condition where your eyes are unable to work together when looking at nearby objects. It can cause difficulty reading, resulting in school age children promptly deciding to close the book and take on a new task, making it understandable for a parent to conclude that attention deficit is the dilemma.

Parents and educators alike often assume that if our child passes a vision screening, they are ok. Vision screenings are not comprehensive eye exams.

Vision is a sense that is not always automatic. It develops in our formative years, between birth and eight years of age. Comprehensive eye exams can detect issues that once addressed, can have lifelong impacts. For school aged children, the American Optometric Association recommends annual eye exams begin before 1st grade and are maintained each year thereafter.

Let’s give our children the best chance at success! Make sure you get your child’s annual eye health and vision exam checked off your list!

Essential vs. Non-Essential Eye Care

As we navigate new processes and protocols as a result of the COVID-19 crisis, you may be wondering, what’s the difference between Essential and Non-Essential Eye Care.

Essential Eye Care services include treatment for medical conditions, including urgent care needs that keep patients from carrying out their regular daily routines. These include:

  • Blurred vision
  • Broken or lost eyewear
  • Eye trauma
  • Vision loss
  • Contact lens-related pain
  • Flashes or floating objects in the eye
  • Light sensitivity
  • Double vision
  • Drooping eyelid
  • Severe or recurring headaches

We are equipped to handle your Essential Eye Care needs so you do not have visit the ER – which may put you at risk of exposure to infection while also potentially taking from patients with critical conditions having no other alternatives.

Non-Essential Eye Care services might also be called “routine,” and not impeding a patient from his/her day-to-day activities, such as:

  • Routine eye exam with no problems
  • First time routine contact lens fittings

As always, our top priority is always your well-being. If you have questions or concerns about any eye health or eye care services – reach out! We are here to help you in any way we can!